San Jose State University Faculty

The following faculty at San Jose State University support the work of the Center for Reaching & Teaching the Whole Child by working on selected projects to integrate a combined SEDTL/ culturally responsive teaching (CRT) lens into teaching practice.

 

Jolynn Asato, Ph.D.
Lecturer
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Jolynn Asato is a lecturer in the department of Elementary Education where she teaches classes on literacy development. Her research interests center around cultivating and honoring the powerful languages and literacies that youth engage in and out of school settings. She is currently working on integrating SEDTL perspectives in her literacy methods courses that facilitate teacher candidates to reflect upon the deeply social and emotional dimension of literacy learning and teaching.

 

Allison Briceño, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Allison Briceño, Ed.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at San José State University, where she coordinates the Bilingual Authorization for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential/MA program. Dr. Briceño was a bilingual teacher and bilingual reading specialist in California public schools for over a decade. Her research interests center around cultivating and honoring the powerful languages and literacies that youth engage in school settings. She is currently working on integrating SEDTL perspectives in her literacy methods courses to facilitate teacher candidates’ reflection upon the social and emotional dimension of literacy learning and teaching.

 

Bonnie Jacobson, MA
SJSU Field Experience Supervisor
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Bonnie is a part-time Lecturer/Supervisor for Teacher Candidates at San Jose State University. She is a retired Elementary School teacher who taught in Title 1 schools for 30 years. She taught English in Vietnamese refugee camps in Hong Kong for 2 years and later worked as a BTSA Coach for 4 years. She has been a teacher, trainer and coach for Complex instruction and Collaborative learning for 12 years.

 

Roxana Marachi, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Dr. Roxana Marachi teaches Foundations of Psychology in Education courses and supervises Middle-Level Credential Candidates in the Department of Teacher Education at San Jose State University. Her research interests focus on interpersonal dynamics among teachers and students, school climate, and school violence prevention. She has presented at numerous national and international conferences and her publications include chapters in the Handbook of School Violence and School Safety: From Research to Practice and the School Services Sourcebook: A Guide for School-Based Professionals as well as research articles in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, The Journal of School Violence, and School Psychology International. In 2009, Dr. Marachi was a Faculty-In-Residence for Educational Psychology at the Center for Faculty Development where she facilitated workshops on Learning and the Brain, Motivation and Cognition, and the Role of Emotions in Learning & Performance. As an advocate for enhancing interpersonal climates in schools, she has contributed to the planning and development of the Center for Reaching & Teaching the Whole Child and looks forward to future work to support the social, emotional, and academic domains of teaching and learning in schools.

 

Dale Mitchell
SJSU Field Experience Supervisor
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Dale is a part-time Lecturer and Supervisor for Teacher Candidates at San Jose State University. She is a retired Elementary School teacher who taught for 30 years in three California school districts. She trained in Reader’s and Writer’s Workshop and participated in the ACE Consortium on alternative assessment. She was a B.T.S.A. support provider and a cooperating teacher for several years and participated in the Masters in Teacher Leadership program at San Jose State University.

 

Colette Rabin, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Colette Rabin has twelve years’ experience teaching grades kindergarten through middle school. She brings this experience to her current role as a teacher educator teaching educational foundations courses, research methods, and student teaching for the last ten years at Mills College and at San Jose State University, where she currently holds the position of Associate Professor. Her research interests are in the social and emotional dimensions of education, care ethics, aesthetics, and social justice. Her most recent publications related to SEL in the Journal of Research in Childhood Education include, “Cultivating Care with a Pedagogy called Rocks-in-the-Basket”; “Learning to Care during Storytime in the Current Context: Moral Education from the Perspective of Care Ethics;” and “My lesson plan was perfect until I tried to teach”: Care ethics into practice in classroom management.” Her most recent presentations at the international conference of the American Education Research Association related to SEL are: “I Would Not Have Considered the Parents”: Teacher Preparation for a Care Ethic in Parent-Teacher Relationships” and “Case Stories Support Teachers Understanding of Social and Emotional Learning.”

 

Patricia Swanson, Ph.D.
Professor and Interim Chair
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Patricia Swanson is Professor of Elementary Education in the Department of Teacher Education at San José State University where she teaches mathematics and social studies courses at both the pre-service and Master’s level. Her current research focuses in mathematics and teachers’ strategic integration of pedagogical content knowledge, the development of academic language, and the incorporation of social and emotional learning skills pertinent to mathematics. She frequently provides professional development to school districts and recently completed a three-year initiative focused on enhancing teachers’ content knowledge in mathematics and meeting the pedagogical needs of young adolescents and English language learners. This work resulted in significant gains in both teacher content knowledge and student achievement. Prior to teaching at the university, Dr. Swanson taught 3rd through 6th grade in bilingual (Spanish/English) classrooms. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University School of Education in 1993 and has over twenty years of experience providing preservice and in-service education to teachers working to enhance access to learning in academically and linguistically diverse classrooms.

 

Grinell Smith, Ph.D.
Associate ProfessorGrinell Smith headshot
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

Grinell Smith is an Associate Professor in the department of Elementary Education where he teaches a range of courses on topics such as school curriculum theory, classroom management, research methods, educational psychology, technology integration, and science methods. His scholarly activities seek to redefine the purpose of education away from conceptions of schools primarily as economic resources governed by market mechanisms and that view children merely as consumers and future wage-earners, and toward a conception of schools as places that strive for the Jeffersonian ideal of producing an informed citizenry of critical thinkers and that help children become happy, healthy, well-adjusted, and fulfilled people who understand how to live balanced lives in the context of our families, communities, cultures, and ecosystems. Grinell believes that paying attention to the social and emotional well-being of students is foundational to this sort of education and subsumes this view in all of the courses he teaches at SJSU. He elucidates these views further in some of his recent publications, including Modern education: a tragedy of the commons (Journal of Curriculum Studies),Teaching care ethics: conceptual understandings and stories for learning (Journal of Moral Education), The way we educate (Schools: Studies in Education), and Stories from five decades (Action in Teacher Education).

 

David Whitenack, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Teacher Education
Connie L. Lurie College of Education
San Jose State University

David Whitenack is a graduate of the Language, Literacy, and Culture program of the Stanford University Graduate School of Education. As an Associate Professor at San José State University, he teaches a foundations and methods course focusing on English learners, supervises pre-service teachers, and coordinates the graduate program in the Elementary Education Department. Dr. Whitenack has published and presented in the areas of English learner education and professional development, particularly in Professional Development Schools and other school-university partnerships. He has led professional development initiatives related to improving the teaching and learning of English learners in local school districts. Dr. Whitenack is currently the Co-Principal Investigator of the U.S. Department of Education funded ELLISA Project, which focuses on integrating English language and literacy development in CCSS/NGSS-aligned content-area lessons. The ELLISA Project includes the creation of Web-based representations of exemplary, integrated teaching, which can be used as curriculum in pre-service teacher education and professional development. Previously, Dr. Whitenack was a Research Fellow with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching where he worked with teachers and teacher educators engaging in inquiry related to multimedia representations of signature pedagogies in K-12 and teacher education classrooms. Dr. Whitenack’s work with the Center for Reaching & Teaching the Whole Child focuses on incorporating the social-emotional dimension of teaching and learning into the English learner foundations and practicum components of the credential program at San José State University.